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Hoarding makes for a poor IT strategy

An IT professional can easily become overwhelmed when trying to help several departments all manage different technology projects at once.

An IT professional can easily become overwhelmed when trying to help several departments all manage different technology projects at once.

Many startups and small and midsize businesses (SMBs) face specific challenges when it comes to technology. They typically have limited personnel and resources, and the distribution of these assets is critical to their success.

Projects must be prioritized, and if your company only has one person qualified to lead three initiatives, something is going to end up being put on the backburner. Inevitably, departments start trying to hoard the time and expertise of such an individual to ensure that their goals are met, even when they come at the expense of another group.

But, when team members that are supposed to be working with each other find themselves operating at cross-purposes, the company is ultimately losing out.

"I once managed a project for a software house and needed a highly skilled transaction processing specialist. We had one – but she was also requested (and assigned) to virtually every other project team in the place," wrote Mary Shacklett for TechRepublic. "It reached the point where this person didn't return phone calls, attend meetings, or even open her door."

As startups and SMBs often come to realize, technology priorities don't stop piling up just because there aren't enough people on staff to handle them all. Quite the opposite. In fact, as the pile turns into a mountain, the few IT professionals they do employ are likely to get overwhelmed and even start looking elsewhere for job opportunities.

The simple solution to this problem is managed IT support. It allows a company to cover all its bases and makes it easier to prioritize projects for a small, in-house staff of technology experts. There's also the added bonus of not driving individuals to lock themselves in their offices and barricade the doors to ward off the onslaught of desperate project managers seeking their help.