Official TEKConn Blog

NTSB drops BlackBerry, says failure rate “unacceptable”

The National Transportation Safety Board is opting for new iPhones rather than continuing to use BlackBerrys.

The National Transportation Safety Board is opting for new iPhones rather than continuing to use BlackBerrys.

Last month we reported that the United States Department of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) abandoned its long-standing relationship with BlackBerry in favor of the iPhone. Last week, another government agency followed suit – and this one was very clear about what prompted the move.

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) announced in a procurement request that BlackBerry devices "have been failing both at inopportune times and at an unacceptable rate."

The agency went on to stress the importance of a unified and reliable platform in its investigations of airplane crashes and other transportation incidents throughout the country.

"The NTSB is a small organization with limited resources," the document reads. "As such, it needs to standardize on a minimum number of operating platforms."

This move clearly shows the strides that Apple has made when it comes to mobile security and ease of use – two things government agencies place a great deal of value in. But, there's an underlying theme here that should not go unnoticed.

While ICE employs some 17,600 individuals, the NTSB is considerably smaller with roughly 400 workers on its payroll. In this context, the latter almost mirrors the needs of small and midsize businesses (SMBs) in the private sector.

Just like their government counterparts, SMBs need mobile electronic devices that are stable, reliable and secure. With the growing amount of sensitive data passing through smartphones and tablets, companies that cannot operate efficiently and protect employee and customer information won't stay in business for long.

These organizations are turning to SMB IT support that can guide them toward the right hardware solutions and operating systems that serve specific needs. In doing so, they can ensure that a wide range of tasks can be completed and large volumes of data can be securely transferred from one device to the next on a standardized OS.